Journalism

Newspaper articles written by George Orwell

Three Years of Home Guard: Unique Symbol of Stability (May 1943)

Three Years of Home Guard: Unique Symbol of Stability (May 1943)

The Observer, 9 May 1943 It is close on three years since the eager amateurs of the L.D.V. doctored shotgun cartridges with candle-grease and practised grenade-throwing with lumps of concrete, and the value of the Home Guard as a fighting force can now be fairly accurately estimated. Although it has never fought, its achievement...
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Common Lodging Houses (September 1932)

Common Lodging Houses (September 1932)

The New Statesman and Nation, 3 September 1932 Common lodging houses, of which there are several hundred in London, are night-shelters specially licensed by the LCC.1 They are intended for people who cannot afford regular lodgings, and in effect they are extremely cheap hotels. It is hard to estimate the lodging-house population, which varies...
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Through a Glass, Rosily

Through a Glass, Rosily

Tribune, 23 November 1945 The recent article by Tribune’s Vienna correspondent provoked a spate of angry letters which, besides calling him a fool and a liar and making other charges of what one might call a routine nature, also carried the very serious implication that he ought to have kept silent even if he...
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French election will be influenced by the fact that women will have first vote (April 1945)

French election will be influenced by the fact that women will have first vote (April 1945)

Manchester Evening News, 16 April 1945 No date has yet been fixed for the General Election, but it has been officially stated that the municipal elections will take place at the end of this month provided that the date fixed does not coincide with some great external event, such as the ending of the...
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Mood of the Moment (19 April 1942)

Mood of the Moment (19 April 1942)

The Observer, 19 April 1942. Published anonymously.1 There is not much grumbling about the Budget. Common ale at tenpence a pint and cigarettes at ten for a shilling, unimaginable a few years ago, now seem hardly worth bothering about. In so far as Sir Kingsley Wood2 is criticised, it is less for what he...
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How a Nation Is Exploited – The British Empire in Burma (May 1929)

Surrender of the Burmese Army to British forces in 1885

Le Progrès Civique, 4 May 1929. Translated into English by Janet Percival and Ian Willison. Following the recent troubles in India, we have asked our contributor, Mr E. A. Blair, whose investigations on ‘The Plight of the British Worker’ have already appeared in these pages, to tell us something of the unrest which has been...
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Just Junk – But Who Could Resist It?

Just Junk – But Who Could Resist It?

Evening Standard, 5 January 1946 Which is the most attractive junk shop in London is a matter of taste, or for debate: but I could lead you to some first-rate ones in the dingier areas of Greenwich, in Islington near the Angel, in Holloway, in Paddington, and in the hinterland of the Edgeware-road. Except...
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Beggars in London (January 1929)

Beggars in London (January 1929)

Le Progrès Civique, 12 January 1929 Any visitor to London must have noticed the large number of beggars one comes across in the streets. These unfortunates, often crippled or blind, can be seen all over the capital. You might say they are part of the scenery. In some areas one can see every three...
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Why Not War Writers? A Manifesto

Why Not War Writers? A Manifesto

Horizon, October 1941 The role of writers to-day, when every free nation and every free man and woman is threatened by the Nazi war-machine, is a matter of supreme importance. Creative writers, poets, novelists and dramatists have a skill, imagina­tion and human understanding which must be utilized as fully as the skill of journalists....
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Can Socialists Be Happy?

Can Socialists Be Happy?

Tribune, 24 December 1943. Written by George Orwell but published under the name ‘John Freeman’. The thought of Christmas raises almost automatically the thought of Charles Dickens, and for two very good reasons. To begin with, Dickens is one of the few English writers who have actually written about Christmas. Christmas is the most...
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