Posts Tagged ‘ socialism ’

The Politics of Starvation

The Politics of Starvation

Tribune, 18 January 1946 A few days ago I received a wad of literature from the “Save Europe Now” committee, which has been attempting—without much encouragement from the Government or help from the Press—to increase the supply of food from this country to Europe. They quote a series of statements from authoritative sources, which I will...
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Catastrophic Gradualism

Catastrophic Gradualism

C. W. Review, November 19451 There is a theory which has not yet been accurately formulated or given a name, but which is very widely accepted and is brought forward whenever it is necessary to justify some action which conflicts with the sense of decency of the average human being. It might be called,...
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Literature and the Left

Literature and the Left

Tribune, 4 June 1943 “When a man of true genius appears in the world, you may know him by this infallible sign, that all the dunces are in conspiracy against him.” So wrote Jonathan Swift, two hundred years before the publication of Ulysses. If you consult any sporting manual or yearbook you will find...
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French election will be influenced by the fact that women will have first vote (April 1945)

French election will be influenced by the fact that women will have first vote (April 1945)

Manchester Evening News, 16 April 1945 No date has yet been fixed for the General Election, but it has been officially stated that the municipal elections will take place at the end of this month provided that the date fixed does not coincide with some great external event, such as the ending of the...
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Kay Ekevall remembers George Orwell

Kay Ekevall remembers George Orwell

Kay Ekevall (b. 1911) ran a secretarial agency and lived near the bookshop on the corner of Pond Street, Hampstead, where Orwell worked part-time in 1934-5; and being of literary tastes, she got to know him by talking about books. They were friends for nearly a year. This is the time when Orwell was...
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Goldstein’s book from George Orwell’s 1984

Goldstein’s book from George Orwell’s 1984

The Theory and Practice of Oligarchical Collectivism, by Emmanuel Goldstein, is the fictional book that is an integral thematic and plot element in the dystopian novel Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949), by George Orwell. In the totalitarian society of Oceania, ruled by the seemingly omnipotent and omniscient Party, in its propaganda, Emmanuel Goldstein is the principal enemy of the state — a former member of the Inner Party – continually conspiring against...
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P.O.U.M. – The Spanish Revolution (February 1937)

The Spanish Revolution - P.O.U.M bulletin (October 1936)

Bulletin of the Workers’ Party of Marxist Unification1 (P.O.U.M.2) 3 February 1937 British Author With the Militia At the beginning of January, we received a visit in Barcelona from Eric Blair, the well-known British author, whose work is so much appreciated in all English-speaking left circles of thought. Comrade Blair came to Barcelona, and...
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Review of “Burnt Norton”, “East Coker” and “The Dry Salvages” by T. S. Eliot

Review of “Burnt Norton”, “East Coker” and “The Dry Salvages” by T. S. Eliot

Poetry London, October-November 1942; reprinted in Little Reviews Anthology, edited by Denys Val Baker, 1943. There is very little in Eliot’s later work that makes any deep impression on me. That is a confession of something lacking in myself, but it is not, as it may appear at first sight, a reason for simply...
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Why Not War Writers? A Manifesto

Why Not War Writers? A Manifesto

Horizon, October 1941 The role of writers to-day, when every free nation and every free man and woman is threatened by the Nazi war-machine, is a matter of supreme importance. Creative writers, poets, novelists and dramatists have a skill, imagina­tion and human understanding which must be utilized as fully as the skill of journalists....
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Can Socialists Be Happy?

Can Socialists Be Happy?

Tribune, 24 December 1943. Written by George Orwell but published under the name ‘John Freeman’. The thought of Christmas raises almost automatically the thought of Charles Dickens, and for two very good reasons. To begin with, Dickens is one of the few English writers who have actually written about Christmas. Christmas is the most...
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