Posts Tagged ‘ writing ’

Letter from Eric Blair to Leonard Moore suggesting George Orwell as a pseudonym (1932)

Letter from Eric Blair to Leonard Moore suggesting George Orwell as a pseudonym (1932)

Sat.1 “The Hawthorns” Church Rd. Hayes  Mdx. Dear Mr Moore, Many thanks for your letter. I sent off the proof with the printer’s queries on it yesterday. I made a few alterations & added one or two footnotes, but I think I arranged it so that there would be no need...
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My favorite Amazon customer reviews for George Orwell’s 1984

My favorite Amazon customer reviews for George Orwell’s 1984

These are real reviews for Orwell’s 1984 from Amazon.com customers. Spelling, grammar and punctuation — all uncorrected. Enjoy! ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ Number of reviews: 1,645 Average rating: Customer Reviews 5 of 70 people found the following review helpful: Nice try George, May 13, 2004 Reviewer: ? 1984 is a fictional novel by...
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Telling the Russians about Orwell

Telling the Russians about Orwell

Gleb Struve (1898-1985), a scholar and specialist on Soviet literature, was at the School of Slavonic Studies, London University, in 1944. He wrote to Orwell and congratulated him on his piece in the Tribune column about Soviet falsification of history. They met and corresponded. It was Struve who intro­duced Orwell to Zamyatin’s futurist novel We,...
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Orwell’s notes for essay on Evelyn Waugh (1949)

Orwell’s notes for essay on Evelyn Waugh (1949)

These notes for an essay on Evelyn Waugh were written by Orwell in his last Literary Notebook. The ellipses seen below are Orwell’s. He said: “I hope it’s dipsomania. That is simply a great misfortune that we must all help him bear. What I used to fear was that he just got drunk deliberately when...
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Unfinished essay on Evelyn Waugh (1949)

Unfinished essay on Evelyn Waugh (1949)

It has not proved possible to date precisely when George Orwell prepared the first part of the typescript of his essay on Evelyn Waugh, nor to date exactly the notes he wrote in his last Literary Notebook, though all are from 1949. On the cover of a red folder Orwell has written ‘Waugh /...
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Oysters and Brown Stout

Oysters and Brown Stout

Tribune, 22 December 1944 G. K. Chesterton said once that every novelist writes one book whose title seems to be a summing-up of his attitude to life. He in­stanced, for Dickens, Great Expectations, and for Scott, Tales of a Grandfather. What title would one choose as especially representative of Thackeray? The obvious one is...
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Literature and the Left

Literature and the Left

Tribune, 4 June 1943 “When a man of true genius appears in the world, you may know him by this infallible sign, that all the dunces are in conspiracy against him.” So wrote Jonathan Swift, two hundred years before the publication of Ulysses. If you consult any sporting manual or yearbook you will find...
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From Animal Farm to Nineteen Eighty-Four (Recollections of George Orwell)

From Animal Farm to Nineteen Eighty-Four (Recollections of George Orwell)

George Woodcock (1912–1995) was a Canadian writer and scholar. He met Orwell during the war while Orwell was at the BBC and when Woodcock was active in the peace movement, working with British Anarchists and libertarians. They became good friends. This is the text of Woodcock’s “Recollections of George Orwell”, Northern Review, August-September 1953. ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ Imagine...
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Birth of George Orwell on 25 June 1903

Eric Blair (George Orwell) held by nanny (1903)

Excerpt from Bernard Crick’s biography George Orwell: A Life. Eric Arthur Blair was born at Motihari in Bengal on 25 June 1903, five years after his sister Marjorie, who was born at Tehta in Bihar. His father, Richard Walmesley Blair, was in the Opium Department of the Government of India. The opium trade with China...
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George Orwell’s rules for effective writing

George Orwell (1945)

Excerpt from Politics and the English Language (1946) by George Orwell. Modern English, especially written English, is full of bad habits which spread by imitation and which can be avoided if one is willing to take the necessary trouble. If one gets rid of these habits one can think more clearly, and to think clearly...
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